Jones Day – Hit with $200 Million Class Action Gender Discrimination That Attacks Alleged Frat-Boy Culture

This seems like one gender discrimination lawsuit the defendant would be wise to settle – and not have it go to trial. Here is the coverage by Dan Packel at Law.com

JonesdayToday, six former Jones Day associates filed the $200 million class action in federal court in D.C. “Nilab R. Tolton, et al. v. Jones Day.” Here is a copy of the lawsuit.

Detailed in the 107-page complaint is how an alleged frat-boy culture results in inequities in what kinds of work is assigned, compensation, and promotion.

It also describes an environment in which sexual harassment is condoned.

In addition, the management system, which operates from the D.C. office, is said to exist with “unchecked autonomy.” At the top of it is Stephen Brogan, in charge of all human factors decisions.

Will his brand and very career get brought down through this development? Lawyers are practiced at scapegoating. As is observed in William Shakespeare’s history play Henry 4, Part 2, Act 3, Scene 1: “Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown,”

It’s no surprise that D.C. is the location for Jones Day’s power.

After all, Jones Day is known as the go-to firm for so many of the Trump Administration’s legal needs. Its former partner Don McGahn had been the head lawyer in the White House. He has left that position and returned as a partner to Jones Day. But most of the dozen other former Jones Day lawyers who followed him to D.C. are still embedded in federal government.

Sanford Heisler Sharp is representing the plaintiffs. Over the years it has become the brand in employment disputes – on the plaintiff side. Among its most high profile clients had been Kerrie Campbell. That ended in a settlement, but not before the defendant – Chadbourne & Parke – was portrayed as an ogre in the media. Smirk smirk. A good time was had by all who followed the litigation in the legal as well as the business media.

This 2019 class action lawsuit against Jones Day symbolizes how far a sense of employee rights has come.

Back in 2007, it seemed like certain career suicide when associate Aaron Charney sued his law firm Sullivan & Cromwell for alleged bias against sexual orientation. But that was settled and Charney went on to another good job in the legal sector.

Thanks to the pioneers ranging from Charney to Campbell even we contract vendors have gained the courage to stand up for ourselves. Not that making a living is easy in the 21st century. But we got it that we have rights.

Also, David Sanford has become the superhero of everyone who has to labor to make a buck. Especially we females.

Categories